Cataloguing

Fragments from the catalogue 1

STC/299 Fragment of a Romanesque pillar piscina carved from Doulting stone, c. 1140. Original source unknown, found during repairs to north transept.
STC/299 Fragment of a Romanesque pillar piscina carved from Doulting stone, c. 1140. Original source unknown, found during repairs to north transept.
STC/299 Romanesque pillar piscina. Reverse shows deep basin carved into the stone, with a hole drilled into the base of the recess – this presumably functioned as a drain.
STC/299 Romanesque pillar piscina. Reverse shows deep basin carved into the stone, with a hole drilled into the base of the recess – this presumably functioned as a drain.
STC/348 Fragment of figure of Archangel Gabriel carved from Bath stone, c. 1400. North transept reredos. The tips of the wing feathers are visible on the right hand side of the image.
STC/348 Fragment of figure of Archangel Gabriel carved from Bath stone, c. 1400. North transept reredos. The tips of the wing feathers are visible on the right hand side of the image.
STC/391 Upper torso of a standing figure sculpture of St John the Baptist with Lamb and flag, c. 1400. North transept reredos.
STC/391 Upper torso of a standing figure sculpture of St John the Baptist with Lamb
and flag, c. 1400. North transept reredos.
STC/384 Feet from a standing figure sculpture of St John the Baptist, c. 1400. North transept reredos. The camel skin cape with which St John the Baptist is sometimes depicted is draped between his feet; the camel’s shin bones protrude from its skin either side of the legs of the saint.
STC/384 Feet from a standing figure sculpture of St John the Baptist, c. 1400. North transept reredos. The camel skin cape with which St John the Baptist is sometimes depicted is draped between his feet; the camel’s shin bones protrude from its skin either side of the legs of the saint.
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One thought on “Fragments from the catalogue 1

  1. I DO think the past church wardens would be pleased that the fragments are being made “comfortable” now.
    What astonishing fragments remain, such as that depicting the Christ child’s hand!
    Thank you for marvellous information.

    Like

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